Megan Taylor

web developer, hack-n-slasher, freelancer, news & data junkie, bibliophile, Flyers fan, sci-fi geek and kitteh servant

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I am a UI Developer at Spies & Assassins / kbs+. Previously, I was the front-end web developer for Jewish National Fund, where one of my projects won an award. In my free time, I teach code to high school students with ScriptEd and freelance through Sore Thumb Marketing. Some of my projects are on GitHub, because I learn more when others can critique my code. I blog about what I’m learning and random tidbits that catch my fancy.

Recent Work

Find-a-Farmers-Market-Near-You-in-New-York-City

NYC Farmers Market Locator

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Quiz Web App

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Shopping List Web App

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Hot or Cold? Guess the Number

Recent Posts

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This month, CSS turned 17 and JavaScript turned 18

Much has happened, both to CSS and the Web, since those days. But on its 17th birthday, I’d like to acknowledge the creators, custodians and champions of CSS in those early days. These were the days before blogging (in any mainstream sense), twitter, and other social media. Indeed, these were the days of newsgroups, the water cooler of the web for its first decade at least. And many of the most important figures in the development, and success, of CSS (and as a consequence the modern web) are little known, though they are the giants whose shoulders we all stand on.

by John Allsopp via Web Directions.

The JavaScript community is moving ahead, often with its usual dramatic “two steps forward one step back” dance, with detractors now being more vocal. JavaScript is no longer the underdog, but the establishment. Keeping that upstart “everything is possible” mentality going for as long as possible will be the challenge of the next 18 years of the language, as it heads into adulthood with a new-found confidence.

via Resin.io.

Being known vs being known FOR

Laid bare was the scum, algae and rocks, making up the foundation and guts of the vessel. Exposed, for all to see. Similarly, this is how I feel about who we are and what we do and this world we live in. On the surface, we can look fantastic — smooth, calm and at our best. But at our essence is a complex ecosystem and environment that let us present the version of us, our work or our lives, that we want everyone else to experience.

by Naz via Work Life | Trent Walton.