Megan Taylor

web developer, hack-n-slasher, freelancer, news & data junkie, bibliophile, Flyers fan, sci-fi geek and kitteh servant

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2014 Recap

In 2014…

I got my dream job!
I took a lot of pictures of my cats, but not enough.
We got a king-sized bed.
We finally went to Coney Island. Twice!
Cleo got her first professional grooming.
I quit smoking cigarettes!
My cat allergies resurfaced.
I ate a lot of really awesome food.
I cooked some really awesome food.
I started playing Ingress.
I made some amazing new friends.
I walked more than 300 miles playing Ingress.
I got to see old friends I hadn’t seen in a while.
I went to the Catskills and crushed apples for cider.
I met my nieces on my husband’s side of the family.
I spoke at a Meetup for the first time, and it was awesome!
I built some cool websites.
I went to the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens.
I saw Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson in a park in Brooklyn.
I saw GWAR for the first time.
I celebrated 4 years of marriage to my amazing husband.
I spent some quality time with my mom, including seeing A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder while she was visiting.
Cleo turned 9.
Pixel turned 1.
And lots more!

Here’s to an awesome 2015.

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Todoist tasks to Dashclock widget Tasker task

Wow that title is hella awkward. This is a writeup of how I got my tasks in Todoist to show up in a Dashclock widget using Tasker.

Pre-reqs:

  • Be using Todoist :)
  • Have an Android phone
  • Install and have some basic knowledge of Tasker
  • Install and have some basic knowledge of Dashclock

So, there is pretty good documentation for most of this around the Internets, I’m going to try to be as detailed as possible, but this is not going to be a fool-proof step-through. More of a guideline. Kinda like the painted lines on the floor in hospitals? Anyway…

ACTIONS 1, 2 and 3

After all my poking and prodding and rewriting, my task in Tasker starts by clearing some variables that will be created later in the task. So the first action should be Variable Clear, and set the name to %Tasks (or whatever, this is going to be an array that holds the final format of all the tasks you pull from Todoist). Then make another Variable Clear action and set the name to %Item (this is going to be an individual task that will end up in the array mentioned above). Then make a third Variable Clear and set the name to %Numtask (this is going to increment with the number of tasks).

ACTION 4

For your fourth action, create an Array Clear and set the name to %TLIST. OK, we’re done with clears.

ACTION 5

The fifth task is going to actually pull you tasks from the Todoist API. I used the /API/query request.

Please review the API documents and get your query URL figured out before continuing. Mine looks like this: https://api.todoist.com/API/query?queries=[“overdue”, “yesterday”, “today”, “tomorrow”]&token=tokentokentoken. It gives me all the tasks that have not been completed that are overdue, due yesterday (for some reason on my account, overdue does not include yesterday. i have been in contact with todoist support and they haven’t figured out why, but using the yesterday query takes care of that for this use case), due today, or due tomorrow.

NOTE: The Dashclock widget will only show the first 5 tasks from the combined list of tasks. If you want to show more, you can create a separate widget for each query.

So create a HTTP Get action and set it up like this:
Server:Port

https://api.todoist.com

Path
API/query
(or whichever request you choose to use)
Attributes
queries=[“overdue”, “yesterday”, “today”, “tomorrow”]&token=tokentokentoken

I didn’t change anything else for this action.

Have I lost you yet? Great! Onward!

ACTION 6

Now I’m going to give you some JavaScript. This was the hardest part for me to figure out, because Tasker doesn’t really support true arrays. So I’m giving you the JavaScript that will parse the query response (assuming you used the same one I did, if not, you will have to edit this). You need to get this into a file on your phone somewhere.

jsonData = JSON.parse(global("HTTPD"));

var y = 0;

if (jsonData[0].data[0] !== 'undefined') {
for (i = 0; i < jsonData[0].data.length; i++) {
setGlobal('TLIST'+y, jsonData[0].data[i].content);
y++;
}
}

if (jsonData[1].data[0] !== 'undefined') {
for (i = 0; i < jsonData[1].data.length; i++) {
setGlobal('TLIST'+y, jsonData[1].data[i].content);
y++;
}
}

if (jsonData[2].data[0] !== 'undefined') {
for (i = 0; i < jsonData[2].data.length; i++) {
setGlobal('TLIST'+y, jsonData[2].data[i].content);
y++;
}
}

if (jsonData[3].data[0] !== 'undefined') {
for (i = 0; i < jsonData[3].data.length; i++) {
setGlobal('TLIST'+y, jsonData[3].data[i].content);
y++;
}
}

Create a JavaScript action (this will be number 6) and set the path to wherever you have stored this file on your phone.

ACTION 7

Create a seventh action, Variable Set. Name should be %Numtask and To should be %TLIST(#<)+1. I don't know why, but it works for me.

ACTION 8

Number eight! Create a For action. Set Variable to %Item and Items to %TLIST(0:).

ACTION 9

Your ninth action is part of a for loop that was initiated by number eight. Create a Variable Set action. Name is set to %Item. Leave To blank.

ACTION 10

For the tenth step create another Variable Set action. Name should be set to %Tasks and To should be set to %Item.

End the for loop with your next action. (Seriously, this is action number eleven, create an End For action).

ACTION 11

FINALLY. Create the Dashclock action.Set the title to %Numtask Tasks in order to display a title above your list in the widget that will say "N Tasks". Or leave it blank. Whatever. Set the body to %Tasks.

Now you have to add this task to a profile. I hope it works for you. Feel free to ask questions, suggest better flow/code or whatever.

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This month, CSS turned 17 and JavaScript turned 18

Much has happened, both to CSS and the Web, since those days. But on its 17th birthday, I’d like to acknowledge the creators, custodians and champions of CSS in those early days. These were the days before blogging (in any mainstream sense), twitter, and other social media. Indeed, these were the days of newsgroups, the water cooler of the web for its first decade at least. And many of the most important figures in the development, and success, of CSS (and as a consequence the modern web) are little known, though they are the giants whose shoulders we all stand on.

by John Allsopp via Web Directions.

The JavaScript community is moving ahead, often with its usual dramatic “two steps forward one step back” dance, with detractors now being more vocal. JavaScript is no longer the underdog, but the establishment. Keeping that upstart “everything is possible” mentality going for as long as possible will be the challenge of the next 18 years of the language, as it heads into adulthood with a new-found confidence.

via Resin.io.

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Stupid, Lazy Programmers?

“It may sound amazing, but you could be a better programmer if you were both lazier and more stupid.

First, you must be stupid, because if you are smart, or if you believe you are smart, you will stop doing two of the most important activities that make a programmer a good one: Learning and being critical of your own work…Second, a good programmer must also be lazy because only a lazy programmer would want to write the kinds of tools that might ultimately replace much of what the programmer does…Perhaps paradoxically, the road toward effective stupidity and laziness can be difficult and laborious, but it deserves to be traveled in order to become a better programmer.”

By Mario Fusco via Be Stupid and Lazy – Programmer 97-things.

Related:

Why Good Programmers Are Lazy and Dumb by Philipp Lenssen.

How to be Lazy, Dumb, and Successful by Jeff Atwood.

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Link Roundup!

Because I’ve been lazy and just posting links on Facebook and Twitter…Pardon the emphasis on ScriptEd and computer science education, this week is CSEdWeek.

“Nationwide there are 3.3 million seniors in high school but in 2012 only 26,000 took the AP Computer Science Test. Wouldn’t it be great if students could try programming while in high school? Why aren’t more high schools teaching computer science?” Why Teach Computer Science in High Schools? | Brian Heese.

“There is also the expert noob, who still haven’t mastered the subject but is already able to get through the most common problems without external help. The expert noob might even be able to teach others.” Being a noob | Blog | Miller Medeiros.

Want to teach kids code? Apply to volunteer with ScriptEd! In particular, we’re looking for Brooklyn folks!

“If we behave like facts don’t matter, then one day they won’t.” Why facts matter — Inside MATTER — Medium.

This is a great list of tips for educators looking to incorporate computational thinking into their curriculum. Also, not just for girls. Beautiful Pixels: Preserving Girls’ interest in Computer Science.

“Even if we taught every disadvantaged young person to code, they would still not have access to the opportunities that today’s successful programmers and technology experts enjoy.” Learn to Code Switch Before You Learn to Code – Anil Dash.

This blog post by one of my ScriptEd students. “I think the one thing I like best about learning to code is the different possibilities for study it provides. Aside from just “coding,” or creating websites, there’s Artificial Intelligence, Computer Engineering, Robotics, and Web Design, among many other topics. It shows that computer science is not just about numbers, but can include Art, writing, problem solving, and multiple ways of thinking.” Not Just About Numbers: A Young Woman’s Perspective on Computer Science Education | Kendra Farrell.

Infographic: “The Job/Student Gap in Computer Science.

“The core of the idea is this: teach others as a way to teach yourself.” My free degree  — Medium.

This video in which ScriptEd students, volunteers and internship providers speak about their internships with ScriptEd.▶ ScriptEd Summer Internship Program – YouTube.

“The Processing Hour of Code was designed to inspire new programmers to try their hand at programming, and what better way than to write some real code that will help other people and improve the tutorial?” An Hour of Code spawns hours of coding.

Two 24ways articles on accessibility: Why Bother with Accessibility? and Coding Towards Accessibility.

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Support my fundraising team for ScriptEd!

hackathon4-52852ce1f13ecScriptEd is the nonprofit I work with to teach HTML, CSS and JavaScript (the basic languages of the web) to high school kids in low-income schools.

From now until January 9th, we’re competing with other nonprofits to raise money. Nonprofits that raise the most money will be awarded additional funding from Crowdrise!

Make your holiday donation to ScriptEd.

Our students are currently getting ready for ScriptEd’s end-of-semester hackathon, where they will build web apps using the skills they’ve learned and compete for prizes.

These kids are really amazing. ScriptEd is an after-school program, so this is in addition to their normal courses and they work really hard!

Make your holiday donation to ScriptEd.