Megan Taylor

front-end dev, volunteacher, news & data junkie, bibliophile, Flyers fan, sci-fi geek and kitteh servant

Not all sunshine and roses

I had a great time at SNDBoston, and I learned a lot. Unfortunately, one of those things made me really sad.

Friday night, SND goers were bused over to a club in the Theatre District, Felt. Somehow, three floors of pool tables and dancing space were reserved just for us.

After milling around to see if anyone I knew (from the blogosphere or otherwise) was there, I settled into a conversation with a couple of older journos hanging out in the back. One of them was very receptive to my explanations and enthusiasm about online journalism. But the other kept asking me, “So, you want to be a tech?”

After some probing, I discovered that a “tech” is someone who shovels content onto the Web site. Ugh.

It came as a surprise, surrounded as I am at school by people who “get it,” or are trying to, that my geeky tendencies would relegate me to something so distasteful. My reporting skills are fine, I just happen to enjoy coding as much as I do writing.

  • It’s sad that some folks don’t see the potential and possibilities of the Web. Correction, some folks don’t want to see the potential and possibilities of the Web. They get scared and decide it’s not for them, ergo it’s not the correct choice for anyone. They are, obviously, wrong.

    It’s a little thing, but you saw how quick many of those folks grabbed on to Twitter at SND — most had never heard of it before and did not see any practical applications for it. Someone just has to show ’em the light of day technology-wise, and sometimes it’s a one-person-at-a-time job.

    It’s easy to tell the papers that “get it” versus those that don’t. So stick with those that do, and know that the others will be following along in a couple of years. It’s also very difficult to find someone who knows coding and journalism, so when you’re lookin for internships or jobs, you should be very much in demand.

  • It’s sad that some folks don’t see the potential and possibilities of the Web. Correction, some folks don’t want to see the potential and possibilities of the Web. They get scared and decide it’s not for them, ergo it’s not the correct choice for anyone. They are, obviously, wrong.

    It’s a little thing, but you saw how quick many of those folks grabbed on to Twitter at SND — most had never heard of it before and did not see any practical applications for it. Someone just has to show ’em the light of day technology-wise, and sometimes it’s a one-person-at-a-time job.

    It’s easy to tell the papers that “get it” versus those that don’t. So stick with those that do, and know that the others will be following along in a couple of years. It’s also very difficult to find someone who knows coding and journalism, so when you’re lookin for internships or jobs, you should be very much in demand.

  • SNDTwitter was freakin awesome. Thanks for the encouragement.

  • SNDTwitter was freakin awesome. Thanks for the encouragement.

  • Hi. :)

    I guess the situations (in my country, the Philippines vs. the USA) are stark. Here, though no one has really heard of online writers that much in the offline world, we enjoy a bigger paycheck than those who do the “real” news. The papers and even magazines may hold prestige, but it is sorely not enough to feed.

    But to get to my point and to relate the issue to what you experienced, most people who are not tech-savvy look down on the Internet… Because they are sorely unskilled in it. Their condescension is just an a show of misplaced pride (for lack of a better word). But with zdnet, cnet, and the other credible blog networks, you could only see how the Internet is encroaching on the world. While some people are skeptical about the ‘Net killing print media, I believe that only the most credible print news networks will survive within 10-20 years. Books may survive longer, but I believe the ‘Net is starting to kill print news and magazines.

    If I’m wrong, I’ll just be eating my words.

    But if I’m right, you’ll be vindicated, and that guy who kept asking you about that… Will have to chew on his shoes for food, if he doesn’t adapt and doesn’t have savings.

    Nyahahaha :D

    Keep on, you’re riding the wave of tech; I believe you’re going the right way. :)

    Lorie

  • Hi. :)

    I guess the situations (in my country, the Philippines vs. the USA) are stark. Here, though no one has really heard of online writers that much in the offline world, we enjoy a bigger paycheck than those who do the “real” news. The papers and even magazines may hold prestige, but it is sorely not enough to feed.

    But to get to my point and to relate the issue to what you experienced, most people who are not tech-savvy look down on the Internet… Because they are sorely unskilled in it. Their condescension is just an a show of misplaced pride (for lack of a better word). But with zdnet, cnet, and the other credible blog networks, you could only see how the Internet is encroaching on the world. While some people are skeptical about the ‘Net killing print media, I believe that only the most credible print news networks will survive within 10-20 years. Books may survive longer, but I believe the ‘Net is starting to kill print news and magazines.

    If I’m wrong, I’ll just be eating my words.

    But if I’m right, you’ll be vindicated, and that guy who kept asking you about that… Will have to chew on his shoes for food, if he doesn’t adapt and doesn’t have savings.

    Nyahahaha :D

    Keep on, you’re riding the wave of tech; I believe you’re going the right way. :)

    Lorie

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