Megan Taylor

front-end dev, volunteacher, news & data junkie, bibliophile, Flyers fan, sci-fi geek and kitteh servant

Typography Documentary: Helvetica

While not on my top 5 movies to see list, this sounds really cool. Even though I don’t see Helvetica used often on the Web, it should still provide some good insight as to how and why to use different typefaces.

Helvetica is a feature-length independent film about typography, graphic design and global visual culture. It looks at the proliferation of one typeface (which is celebrating its 50th birthday this year) as part of a larger conversation about the way type affects our lives. Helvetica will begin screening at film festivals worldwide starting in March, followed by cinema screenings across the US and Europe, and the DVD release.

Sidenote: I keep being told by other students (not by teachers) that Tahoma is the preferred and most professional typeface for the Web. Yet, I don’t see many sites using Tahoma. Tahoma is not one of the “safe fonts” and

is very similar to Verdana but with a narrower body, less generous counters, tighter letterspacing, and a more complete Unicode character set. (Wikipedia)

My confusion is that the people I’ve heard this from are capable Web designers. Why are they insisting on using a non-safe font that looks almost exactly like Verdana, which is safe?

  • Craig

    I was at the world premiere of “Helvetica: The Movie” at SXSW.

    Anyone suggesting using Tahoma for Web design must be extremely Microsoft-centric–maybe even without realizing how much so.

  • I was at the world premiere of “Helvetica: The Movie” at SXSW.

    Anyone suggesting using Tahoma for Web design must be extremely Microsoft-centric–maybe even without realizing how much so.

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