Megan Taylor

front-end dev, volunteacher, news & data junkie, bibliophile, Flyers fan, sci-fi geek and kitteh servant

News Junky

I get my news through RSS feeds. Sometimes it feels like its an IV; I get something like 200 messages a day. A lot of them I can just skim through or read the headlines on. But keeping up still takes up quite a chunk of my day. Sometimes I have to mark an interesting post for a time when I can devote my full attention to its contents.

I subscribe to news, linguistics, journalism, technology, Internet and other blogs, websites, and online news portals. All in the attempt to make sure that I know what is going on in the various arenas that capture my interest.

As a journalist, I have to pay attention to what is going on in the world. As a “net girl” I also pay attention to innovations in technology and online.

You know what? Some days, it’s too much to absorb. Some days, it makes my brain hurt.

I feel kinda silly asking this, since I don’t think anyone reads this blog yet:
What do you consider to be the most important sources of information? For whatever interests you, where do you go to keep up? How, oh how, do you handle the insanity?!

5/4/2009 Update: Three years later I have over 400 subscriptions in my Google Reader and I check it for new items obsessively. Almost all my information comes to me through GR or Twitter these days.

  • Paul Conley

    Hi Megan,
    Don’t be so negative. At least one person reads and enjoys your blog. And I suspect that many other folks who follow the world of journalism and journalism education do so too.
    To answer your question — I live on RSS. I’m not sure how I ever functioned without it. I subscribe to a few hundred feeds. Some are for fun. Some are for work. But the truth is that I could dump most of them and still remain connected to the things that interest me as long as I could see the Wall Street Journal and Rexblog.

  • Paul Conley

    Hi Megan,Don’t be so negative. At least one person reads and enjoys your blog. And I suspect that many other folks who follow the world of journalism and journalism education do so too.To answer your question — I live on RSS. I’m not sure how I ever functioned without it. I subscribe to a few hundred feeds. Some are for fun. Some are for work. But the truth is that I could dump most of them and still remain connected to the things that interest me as long as I could see the Wall Street Journal and Rexblog.

  • Mindy McAdams

    Hi, Megan. I also read and enjoy your blog (hi, Paul! Nice to see you here!). I recommend Bloglines to control the madness. I feel comfortable ignoring lots of my feeds as long as I know that Bloglines is keeping track of what’s read and unread for me!

  • Mindy McAdams

    Hi, Megan. I also read and enjoy your blog (hi, Paul! Nice to see you here!). I recommend Bloglines to control the madness. I feel comfortable ignoring lots of my feeds as long as I know that Bloglines is keeping track of what’s read and unread for me!

  • Megan Taylor

    Mindy, I used to use Bloglines but found that if I accumulated too many unread feeds it would stop collecting new ones. Google Reader doesn’t do that and I use Google for everything anyway.
    My new trick is to go through a few times a day and “star” articles I think I might want to read fully, otherwise just scanning headlines and summaries. Then when I have spare time (on the weekends) I can read through everything.

  • Megan Taylor

    Mindy, I used to use Bloglines but found that if I accumulated too many unread feeds it would stop collecting new ones. Google Reader doesn’t do that and I use Google for everything anyway.My new trick is to go through a few times a day and “star” articles I think I might want to read fully, otherwise just scanning headlines and summaries. Then when I have spare time (on the weekends) I can read through everything.

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